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Depot Artspace Members Exhibition – CALL OUT



 

Depot Artspace Members Exhibition – CALL OUT

Depot Artspace extends an invitation to all Members to present works for Big Little Show: Members Exhibition 2018, a curated exhibition of small works. See details here or give us a call on on 9632331 to find out more.




PulseArt: Potpourri Opening



 

At the opening of Potpourri, an exhibition by PulseArt at Depot Artspace, 6 – 24 October 2018

Lesbian art collective PulseArt was formed in 1999 and while only one of the original artists remain in the group, their objective remains;

“We wanted to have a way of expressing our identity without constantly arguing for it. This wasn’t an intentional political act although we are very aware that ‘the personal is political’, nor was it a deliberate act of separatism, but rather a desire to exhibit together in a comfortable and safe space. We wanted greater lesbian visibility.

Our reason for being a lesbian group remains the same; identity is important to us. Some labels are more acceptable than others. Identity politics is now seen as anachronistic. Our desire to maintain it in our current climate of equality has often been seen as unnecessary when we’ve achieved so much. We feel strongly that without asserting our identity we will disappear.

Labels exist. As lesbians we exist. Our art is an important vehicle for claiming who we are – for labelling ourselves ‘lesbian’. It speaks out for us”. PulseArt 2018




BiblioHub – book launches and celebrations



BiblioHub: September 28 – October 3

As part of celebrating Devonport’s rich and diverse literary community, BiblioHub brings together local booksellers, book-makers, book writers of all genre, and book lovers.

BiblioHub events at Depot Artspace included book launches by local authors Geoff Allen and Mickey Smith; Michael King:  A Commemoration by the Michael King Writers Centre in the Vernacular Lounge;  Frank Sargeson – 70th Anniversary of the Sargeson House and displays from Paradox Books, Devonport Library Associates, Flagstaff, Bookmark and Depot Press.

BiblioHub is Depot Artspace’ inaugural celebration of Devonport’s rich literary community; its writers, writing collectives, readers clubs’, book outlets and bibliophiles .

Devonport may have the biggest population of writers, aficionados and affiliates, along with its significant literary heritage, in Aotearoa and BiblioHub is here to celebrate this phenomenon.

This is our first event and we have hardly touched the surface of this fertile field, but we hope to have planted a small garden which, by this time next year will have borne more splendid fruit.

Guests enjoyed launching Mickey Smith’s latest book,  As You Will: Carnegie Libraries of the South Pacific at Depot Artspace on Saturday, as part of Depot’s BiblioHub.

As you Will is available online through the publisher Te Tuhi and at selected bookstores.

http://shop.tetuhi.org.nz/products/mickey-smith-as-you-will-carnegie-libraries-of-the-south-pacific

 

Depot Artspace, publisher Makaro Press, Geoff Allen and guests celebrate his new publication Fairies of Down Under and other Pakeha Fairy Tales.  The book is available through Makaro Press and selected bookstores.

 

 

 

 

 




Grassroots and Change



Kuini Karanui speaks at the Turangawaewae: Sense of Place exhibition at Depot Artspace

‘Grassroots’ is defined as ‘community-engaged’; grassroots are the people in and of a community, as contrasted with those at the top, ‘the leadership or elite of a private or government organisation.’

Depot Artspace is proudly grass roots. From this point it keeps an ear to the ground, the place where people stand – their turangawaewae – and from which, if nurtured, things grow and are sustained.

Over nearly more than two decades, the Depot has developed facilities, services and new initiatives that respond to the needs and interests of the creative community, both local and beyond. These include: galleries; recording and rehearsal studios; ArtsLab, the biggest professional development programme for artists nationally; creative internships research and development; Cultural Icons, a filmed interview series (78 interviews so far) with people who have been significant in the cultural landscape; Depot Press, including ‘The Vernacularist’ journal, W’akaputanga, Turangawaewae/Sense of Place and LOUD magazine.

(more…)




MāoriGrl in the Context of Atua Wahine [Videos]



On Sunday 8 July we were privileged to have renowned researcher and author Dr Aroha Yates Smith and her daughter Kahurangiariki Smith hosting a special artist talk discussing the development of the video game MāoriGrl in relation to Yates-Smith’s thesis Hine! E Hine! Rediscovering the Feminine in Maori Spirituality (1998).

Together they expanded on the story of Hine-nui-te-pō and other atua wāhine (Māori goddesses) presence in today’s world, the reciprocal interaction of ancestors and descendants taking care of the environment, and the relevance of atua wāhine in Aotearoa’s society today.

 

Here is Part One and Part Two of the Artist Kōrero: MāoriGrl in the Context of Atua Wahine that was live streamed on our Facebook page – Sunday 8 July 2018 [1pm – 2:30pm]




MEDIA RELEASE: Aotearoa forest, flora and whenua enrich Depot Artspace gallery for Matariki 2018



Two thought-provoking exhibitions honouring the natural environment will be on display at Depot Artspace from 14 to 25 July for the Matariki Festival 2018.

Forest has the Blues is a printmaking installation project that draws the unique plant life of Aotearoa into the gallery space to boldly question the limits of plant regrowth and regeneration in a high density urban environment like Auckland.

In keeping with this theme, the exhibition Whenua: Land curated by Depot Artspace Māori Liaison, Jermaine Reihana, celebrates distinctive perceptions of and relationships to whenua of artists both past and present.

 

Click here for the full media release. 

 

Image credit: Celia Walker (top artwork), Takuranga by Richard Joughin (bottom artwork)




Kerr St Artspace becomes Whare Toi with unique blessing ceremony



Tuesday, July 3, Takarunga Mt Victoria

6am, and the maunga wears its fading korowai of night. There are stars still and the moon at half-mast. Below us the baubled city stands to attention.

 

We are gathered in the arms of Takarunga, mana whenua, manuhiri, kaitiaki, community, those for whom the maunga is home, guide, companion and seer, to bless Kerr St Artspace with a new name, Whare Toi which signifies our relationship with Tupuna Maunga Authority and honours our attachment to Takarunga.

Among us are Roger Giles of the Bunker, Jan McEwan and Tania Stewart of MKWC, David Wright, Director of the Navy Museum, Council and Local Board representatives, Chris Darby, Richard Hills and Mike Cohen, TMA members Paul Puru, Dominic Wilson and Nick Turoa and Depot Artspace whanau, represented by Jermaine Reihana who speaks to the kaupapa of the Depot which brought us to Takarunga more than 15 years sgo.

Whare Toi is blessed by kaumatua Jim Rauwhero and kaikaranga caller Dolly Tai Rakena both gifted by ancestry tupuna with the whakapapa of the maunga.

Each of us follows them through the building, touching its wooden bones, acknowledging its presence on Takarunga for 7 decades or more, and its constant service to this community; as a post-war transit house for those waiting to be re-homed, as one of Auckland’s early community houses, as a youth employment centre and now as an arts hub offering arts classes and a professional development programme for creatives.

As the sun rises we share kai and some good conversation with our community of friends, old and new, and with hearts warmed and bellies content we take our leave from Whare Toi.




Kahurangiariki Smith interviewed by Radio New Zealand for MāoriGrl exhibition



The very talented Kahurangiariki Smith was interviewed by Te Manu Korihi reporter John Boynton from RNZ last week about her #debutsoloshow MāoriGrl!

“Kahurangiariki made the game over a year as part of an art project, and with a limited background in gaming and programming she found the process tough.

I just wanted to bring back this knowledge about atua wāhine like Hine-nui-te-pō – her in particular because she’s been kind of demonised over the years.

I’d love to expand on this story and expand more on mum’s thesis and the atua wāhine she mentions there.”

 

Click here to read the full article on the RNZ website!