The Cultural Mapping Project



Cultural mapping is a dynamic process which uncovers social and cultural connections and gives them visibility.  It is these connections which form the underlying structure to our perpetually developing cultural, social and creative environment.

The Depot Artspace application of cultural mapping involves asking individuals and groups to share their knowledge and experience of a particular social or cultural environment meaningful to them.

These responses are then made accessible to others by a visual or audio representation.

Because the Depot Artspace is a multi-disciplinary creative community we are exploring the contributing cultural, social and creative aspects of the New Zealand vernacular and personal/communal identity, experience and expression.

You can find out more about the project at the Depot Artspace Vernacular Lounge where several mapping examples are growing. We welcome your ideas, input and involvement – is there a map you think needs making?

If you would like to express your ideas please come in and visit us or contact Linda Blincko on (09)963 2331 or .

“What a marvellous thing is a map…. Without some kind of a map we only have a small idea of where we are, an even smaller one of where we have been and not the slightest chance of where best we might go”.
Hamish Keith

Some of the examples of the mapping process include “Molly Macalister – The Sculptor and the Controversy” which focuses on the life and work of the sculptor Molly Macalister. One of the milestones in Molly’s career was being the first female artist to receive a commission for a public artwork in New Zealand (The Maori Chief, 1964-1967).

Also growing in content and depth is the Devonport Cultural Genealogy Map which makes visual the community of artists and creatives who are linked to the geographical area of Devonport.

These examples work in unison by stimulating contemplation of the interconnectivity between all of us and how that has contributed throughout history to our current creative environment.

You can find out more about the NZ Cultural Genealogy Project here: www.nzculturalgenealogymapping.wordpress.com