Tag Archives: Painting



Agi Lehar-Graham: Sky and Sea Paintings



Opening in the Small Dog Gallery
Saturday 26 April 2 – 3.30pm

On or around the coast, the weather, the time of day, the light bouncing off the various surfaces of the water, clouds and land – all these things change in front of you as you watch. Even on a still day, the colours and the textures of the shadows and light are slowly changing; or when the wind is blowing and the clouds are pushed along the light and reflections are fleeting.

Back in the studio, Agi Lehar-Graham tries to recreate these moments or moods by pushing and pulling blobs and squizzles of paint around. She attempts to represent the scene without losing the nature of the paint; Lehar-Graham transforms an opaque blob into something quite different yet still keeps the feel and physicality of the paint.

View Agi’s catalogue here.




John Hodgson: T.A.W. the american wars



Opening in the Main Gallery
Saturday 26 April 2 – 3.30pm 

T.A.W. the american wars
A visual reflection on global conflict, a journey,
A tweak at the hem of political and religious rhetoric…

T.A.W. is an ongoing seven year journey in paint. Having been deeply affected by the events of the ‘war on terror’,  John Hodgson conceived T.A.W. as a visual exploration of the intersections of war, faith and politics. Skeptical of the usages of faith to the ends of politics and war, Hodgson poses questions of estrangement, victimhood, captivity, and vulnerability.

Executed in layers, scraped back, re-worked and emended, they reference each other yet are able to stand alone, evoking poignancy, lostness and aloneness in the midst of events. This series of work uses a calligraphic mark making applied in a ‘stream of conscious’ using charcoal and crayon; emended, modified, deleted, added to with layers of paint, to convey emotion, ambiguity and achieve visual and emotional as well as intellectual engagement.

Artist Talk with Q & A: Sunday April 27, Depot Artspace, Main Gallery at 12pm.

John Hodgson will introduce his body of work T.A.W. the american wars, covering what his key drivers are, the technical aspects of his painting practice, and where he is heading as a full time artist. The main focus of the talk is to be guided by audience interest so your questions and comments are welcome.  John will also be in the gallery at various times during the show including all day Sunday April 27 and Sunday May 4, and is happy to interact one on one.

View John’s catalogue here.




Agi Lehar-Graham: Sky and Sea Paintings



Opening in the Small Dog Gallery
Saturday 26 April 2 – 3.30pm

On or around the coast, the weather, the time of day, the light bouncing off the various surfaces of the water, clouds and land – all these things change in front of you as you watch. Even on a still day, the colours and the textures of the shadows and light are slowly changing; or when the wind is blowing and the clouds are pushed along the light and reflections are fleeting.

Back in the studio, Agi Lehar-Graham tries to recreate these moments or moods by pushing and pulling blobs and squizzles of paint around. She attempts to represent the scene without losing the nature of the paint; Lehar-Graham transforms an opaque blob into something quite different yet still keeps the feel and physicality of the paint.

View Agi’s catalogue here.




John Hodgson: T.A.W. the american wars



Opening in the Main Gallery
Saturday 26 April 2 – 3.30pm 

T.A.W. the american wars
A visual reflection on global conflict, a journey,
A tweak at the hem of political and religious rhetoric…

T.A.W. is an ongoing seven year journey in paint. Having been deeply affected by the events of the ‘war on terror’,  John Hodgson conceived T.A.W. as a visual exploration of the intersections of war, faith and politics. Skeptical of the usages of faith to the ends of politics and war, Hodgson poses questions of estrangement, victimhood, captivity, and vulnerability.

Executed in layers, scraped back, re-worked and emended, they reference each other yet are able to stand alone, evoking poignancy, lostness and aloneness in the midst of events. This series of work uses a calligraphic mark making applied in a ‘stream of conscious’ using charcoal and crayon; emended, modified, deleted, added to with layers of paint, to convey emotion, ambiguity and achieve visual and emotional as well as intellectual engagement.

Artist Talk with Q & A: Sunday April 27, Depot Artspace, Main Gallery at 12pm.

John Hodgson will introduce his body of work T.A.W. the american wars, covering what his key drivers are, the technical aspects of his painting practice, and where he is heading as a full time artist. The main focus of the talk is to be guided by audience interest so your questions and comments are welcome.  John will also be in the gallery at various times during the show including all day Sunday April 27 and Sunday May 4, and is happy to interact one on one.

View John’s catalogue here.




Rina Botha: Female Landscapes



Opening in the Small Dog Gallery
Saturday 8 March 2 – 3.30pm

Rina Botha finds the female figure in the New Zealand scenery and conveys it in her rolling landscapes. Gentle hills, verdant forests and wild waves become potent symbols of the primal feminine power inherent in nature. The female form reveals strength, fluidity, beauty, passion and power.

The feminine is depicted at times with tender subtleness and at other times with extreme obviousness. There is a richness and fullness in her work that draws you in to explore mother earth and feel the energy of nature pulsing within.

Once you immerse yourself in the artist’s world, you may perceive your local landscape with an altered sense, finding the female energy within your surroundings waiting to be released on canvas.




Rina Botha: Female Landscapes



Opening in the Small Dog Gallery
Saturday 8 March 2 – 3.30pm

Rina Botha finds the female figure in the New Zealand scenery and conveys it in her rolling landscapes. Gentle hills, verdant forests and wild waves become potent symbols of the primal feminine power inherent in nature. The female form reveals strength, fluidity, beauty, passion and power.

The feminine is depicted at times with tender subtleness and at other times with extreme obviousness. There is a richness and fullness in her work that draws you in to explore mother earth and feel the energy of nature pulsing within.

Once you immerse yourself in the artist’s world, you may perceive your local landscape with an altered sense, finding the female energy within your surroundings waiting to be released on canvas.




Reece James King: Am I



Opening in the Small Dog Gallery
Saturday 1 March 2 – 3.30pm

The first thing that catches your eye with Reece James King’s work is the painting technique; he has a strong and mature drawing hand that is very distinctive. It embraces the paradox of no control, but then total control of that. There is a sense of knowing exactly what’s taking place; yet ironically, knowing he does not know, therefore not affirming ‘I Am’ but asking Am I? Everything in each painting is there for a reason, a purpose, it is all relative. Everything that is put down on to the canvas is painted with a raw immediacy, that is King’s painting vernacular.

Am I is a series about the rejection of the system dictating the norm, and the predetermined thinking of the morals that have built up in the New Zealand art world. He is not only concerned with the image or the what, but more so with the form, and the how; asking why through how not what. The works create a sense of revealing something that has to be revealed and encourages the audience to overthink and overanalyse what is happening; taking them on their own journey of discovery.

View Reece’s catalogue here.




Reece James King: Am I



Opening in the Small Dog Gallery
Saturday 1 March 2 – 3.30pm

The first thing that catches your eye with Reece James King’s work is the painting technique; he has a strong and mature drawing hand that is very distinctive. It embraces the paradox of no control, but then total control of that. There is a sense of knowing exactly what’s taking place; yet ironically, knowing he does not know, therefore not affirming ‘I Am’ but asking Am I? Everything in each painting is there for a reason, a purpose, it is all relative. Everything that is put down on to the canvas is painted with a raw immediacy, that is King’s painting vernacular.

Am I is a series about the rejection of the system dictating the norm, and the predetermined thinking of the morals that have built up in the New Zealand art world. He is not only concerned with the image or the what, but more so with the form, and the how; asking why through how not what. The works create a sense of revealing something that has to be revealed and encourages the audience to overthink and overanalyse what is happening; taking them on their own journey of discovery.

View Reece’s catalogue here.




Graham Downs: Retrospective – Fifty Years of Day-Dreaming



Opening in the Main Gallery
Saturday 15 February 2 – 3.30pm

“I started carrying my paint box around when I was eight years old. I was always recording or creating something, from spear guns and underwater cameras to paint boxes and yachts. As a teenager, weekends were spent travelling around with my mates, sailing, surfing and painting. I also had a keen interest in photography and had my own darkroom.

With my interest in art and my unusual view of the world, it was obvious that a career in art was where I was headed and working as an advertising art director/graphic designer offered a world of opportunity and travel. My interest in illustration and photography was my strong point and as a designer, I often conceived the work and completed the final illustrations and photography. Like other Kiwis working abroad, I had no fear of having a crack at anything and solved problems that overseas art directors walked away from. This kiwi can do attitude served me well and I soon became the senior art director with many leading international ad agencies.

I returned to New Zealand in 1983 and set myself up as an illustrator. There was no real illustration industry then and I played a major part in establishing it. My work won many national and international awards, but for me painting was always my first love, so after a lifetime of conceptual work I am more interested in the beauty of the world and the painting of light and the application of paint and the finished surface and effect. This exhibition shows my personal and commercial work, although there are many gaps, as I never collected my own work.”  – Graham Downs

View Graham’s exhibition catalogue here.




Graham Downs: Retrospective – Fifty Years of Day-Dreaming



Opening in the Main Gallery
Saturday 15 February 2 – 3.30pm

“I started carrying my paint box around when I was eight years old. I was always recording or creating something, from spear guns and underwater cameras to paint boxes and yachts. As a teenager, weekends were spent travelling around with my mates, sailing, surfing and painting. I also had a keen interest in photography and had my own darkroom.

With my interest in art and my unusual view of the world, it was obvious that a career in art was where I was headed and working as an advertising art director/graphic designer offered a world of opportunity and travel. My interest in illustration and photography was my strong point and as a designer, I often conceived the work and completed the final illustrations and photography. Like other Kiwis working abroad, I had no fear of having a crack at anything and solved problems that overseas art directors walked away from. This kiwi can do attitude served me well and I soon became the senior art director with many leading international ad agencies.

I returned to New Zealand in 1983 and set myself up as an illustrator. There was no real illustration industry then and I played a major part in establishing it. My work won many national and international awards, but for me painting was always my first love, so after a lifetime of conceptual work I am more interested in the beauty of the world and the painting of light and the application of paint and the finished surface and effect. This exhibition shows my personal and commercial work, although there are many gaps, as I never collected my own work.”  – Graham Downs

View Graham’s exhibition catalogue here.




James Morgan: Works In Progress



James Morgan will be developing his practice over the course of three weeks here at the Depot Artspace. Morgan will take over the Vernacular Lounge where he will exhibit and paint simultaneously.
The space will be open to the public for viewing at various times.

 




James Morgan: Works In Progress



James Morgan will be developing his practice over the course of three weeks here at the Depot Artspace. Morgan will take over the Vernacular Lounge where he will exhibit and paint simultaneously.
The space will be open to the public for viewing at various times.

 




John Davis: Seven Days of Creation



Opening in the Small Dog Gallery
Saturday 1 February 2 – 3.30pm

John Davis presents a series of paintings based on the Seven Days of Creation. In chronological order, Davis takes the viewer through a series of ‘snapshots’ – from the Big Bang to the coming of God to planet Earth, and beyond – where he has stuck to his personal belief structure, “One Planet, One People/One Universe, One God.”

This series speaks for him about theosophy, the universe and love. These have been constant themes in his work for many years, but it is only now, in this series that they have, as if by magic, merged together.

“The greatest magician would be the one who would cast over himself a spell so complete that he would take his own phantasmagorias as autonomous appearances. Would not this be our case?”Novalis




Nigel Smith, Steve Varney & Graham Young: Three Worlds Collide



Opening in the Main Gallery
Saturday 1 February 2 – 3.30pm

Three artists who started in the same place and took three different routes on their journeys, to collide eventually, at the same destination.
Their work reflects those journeys, shaping three different views to produce a fascinating exhibition of colour, shape and texture.

An exhibition of three different styles, three different genres and three different approaches from artists Nigel Smith, Steve Varney and Graham Young.

Nigel Smith paints abstract works, that also encompass photography and Photoshop images, where he likes to allow for random and improvised elements. He has developed two streams of work; his ’dreamscapes’ are often ambiguous or partially abstracted with a landscape or figurative element, and his second body of work is more abstract.

Steve Varney’s surrealist prints are based on his ideas and imagination. Varney likes the fact that in art, anything is possible and that you are not limited to reality. He sketches his ideas then transfers them to computer to render them. His biggest influences are the natural and the unnatural world.

Graham Young has built a reputation for creating paintings that capture the vibrancy of contemporary New Zealand life through realism, sparkling light and bold colour. Young’s impressive oil paintings have made their way into collections both here and overseas.

View the exhibition catalogue here.




Nigel Smith, Steve Varney & Graham Young: Three Worlds Collide



Opening in the Main Gallery
Saturday 1 February 2 – 3.30pm

Three artists who started in the same place and took three different routes on their journeys, to collide eventually, at the same destination.
Their work reflects those journeys, shaping three different views to produce a fascinating exhibition of colour, shape and texture.

An exhibition of three different styles, three different genres and three different approaches from artists Nigel Smith, Steve Varney and Graham Young.

Nigel Smith paints abstract works, that also encompass photography and Photoshop images, where he likes to allow for random and improvised elements. He has developed two streams of work; his ’dreamscapes’ are often ambiguous or partially abstracted with a landscape or figurative element, and his second body of work is more abstract.

Steve Varney’s surrealist prints are based on his ideas and imagination. Varney likes the fact that in art, anything is possible and that you are not limited to reality. He sketches his ideas then transfers them to computer to render them. His biggest influences are the natural and the unnatural world.

Graham Young has built a reputation for creating paintings that capture the vibrancy of contemporary New Zealand life through realism, sparkling light and bold colour. Young’s impressive oil paintings have made their way into collections both here and overseas.

View the exhibition catalogue here.




John Davis: Seven Days of Creation



Opening in the Small Dog Gallery
Saturday 1 February 2 – 3.30pm

John Davis presents a series of paintings based on the Seven Days of Creation. In chronological order, Davis takes the viewer through a series of ‘snapshots’ – from the Big Bang to the coming of God to planet Earth, and beyond – where he has stuck to his personal belief structure, “One Planet, One People/One Universe, One God.”

This series speaks for him about theosophy, the universe and love. These have been constant themes in his work for many years, but it is only now, in this series that they have, as if by magic, merged together.

“The greatest magician would be the one who would cast over himself a spell so complete that he would take his own phantasmagorias as autonomous appearances. Would not this be our case?”Novalis




Vickie Worthington: People and Place



Vickie Worthington’s work is inspired by the environment in which she lives and her latest exhibition at the Depot Artspace, People and Place, portrays the people and landscape of her former and current homes, Otaki and Waiheke Island respectively. (more…)