Tag Archives: Printmaking



Susan Hurrell-Fieldes, Susanne Khouri & Celia Walker: 52 Weeks



Opening in the Small Dog Gallery
Saturday 22 March 2 – 3.30pm

Three printmakers, Susan Hurrell-Fieldes, Susanne Khouri and Celia Walker embarked on a project marking the passage of a year by each making one printed work per week, beginning in March 2013. As the year progressed, a variety of printmaking methodologies were used to make personal marks and explorations, record events and places, and make visual notations of the passing weeks. Three very different approaches demonstrate the various ways the artists use in their mark-making. Each artist has chosen and utilised strategies that best express their personal intentions and working styles.

Although primarily abstract, Susan Hurrell-Fieldes’ work evokes themes of disintegration, instability and loss.

Susanne Khouri focuses on more personal themes concerning family and relationships across generations, weaving into her work the connection with her young granddaughter.

Celia Walker’s interest in landscape and memory is a constant thread through works which register personal travels and cartographic histories.




Susan Hurrell-Fieldes, Susanne Khouri & Celia Walker: 52 Weeks



Opening in the Small Dog Gallery
Saturday 22 March 2 – 3.30pm

Three printmakers, Susan Hurrell-Fieldes, Susanne Khouri and Celia Walker embarked on a project marking the passage of a year by each making one printed work per week, beginning in March 2013. As the year progressed, a variety of printmaking methodologies were used to make personal marks and explorations, record events and places, and make visual notations of the passing weeks. Three very different approaches demonstrate the various ways the artists use in their mark-making. Each artist has chosen and utilised strategies that best express their personal intentions and working styles.

Although primarily abstract, Susan Hurrell-Fieldes’ work evokes themes of disintegration, instability and loss.

Susanne Khouri focuses on more personal themes concerning family and relationships across generations, weaving into her work the connection with her young granddaughter.

Celia Walker’s interest in landscape and memory is a constant thread through works which register personal travels and cartographic histories.




Nigel Smith, Steve Varney & Graham Young: Three Worlds Collide



Opening in the Main Gallery
Saturday 1 February 2 – 3.30pm

Three artists who started in the same place and took three different routes on their journeys, to collide eventually, at the same destination.
Their work reflects those journeys, shaping three different views to produce a fascinating exhibition of colour, shape and texture.

An exhibition of three different styles, three different genres and three different approaches from artists Nigel Smith, Steve Varney and Graham Young.

Nigel Smith paints abstract works, that also encompass photography and Photoshop images, where he likes to allow for random and improvised elements. He has developed two streams of work; his ’dreamscapes’ are often ambiguous or partially abstracted with a landscape or figurative element, and his second body of work is more abstract.

Steve Varney’s surrealist prints are based on his ideas and imagination. Varney likes the fact that in art, anything is possible and that you are not limited to reality. He sketches his ideas then transfers them to computer to render them. His biggest influences are the natural and the unnatural world.

Graham Young has built a reputation for creating paintings that capture the vibrancy of contemporary New Zealand life through realism, sparkling light and bold colour. Young’s impressive oil paintings have made their way into collections both here and overseas.

View the exhibition catalogue here.




Nigel Smith, Steve Varney & Graham Young: Three Worlds Collide



Opening in the Main Gallery
Saturday 1 February 2 – 3.30pm

Three artists who started in the same place and took three different routes on their journeys, to collide eventually, at the same destination.
Their work reflects those journeys, shaping three different views to produce a fascinating exhibition of colour, shape and texture.

An exhibition of three different styles, three different genres and three different approaches from artists Nigel Smith, Steve Varney and Graham Young.

Nigel Smith paints abstract works, that also encompass photography and Photoshop images, where he likes to allow for random and improvised elements. He has developed two streams of work; his ’dreamscapes’ are often ambiguous or partially abstracted with a landscape or figurative element, and his second body of work is more abstract.

Steve Varney’s surrealist prints are based on his ideas and imagination. Varney likes the fact that in art, anything is possible and that you are not limited to reality. He sketches his ideas then transfers them to computer to render them. His biggest influences are the natural and the unnatural world.

Graham Young has built a reputation for creating paintings that capture the vibrancy of contemporary New Zealand life through realism, sparkling light and bold colour. Young’s impressive oil paintings have made their way into collections both here and overseas.

View the exhibition catalogue here.